The Profit Edje Video Newsletter

Why Cutting Fluid Goes Bad

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

In today’s episode, I am going to briefly discuss why cutting fluid goes bad! The quickest way to ruin your day is to turn on the CNC machine and have the smell of rotten eggs permeate the shop air the first thing in the morning.

Why does it smell so bad? Simple…bacteria, not just any bacteria, mind you..but anaerobic bacteria. These foul demons are sandwiched between the surface of the coolant and the oil that lays on its surface. They feed on the oil.

OK, you say, thanks for the biochemistry course, but why is there a smell? The smell is from the decomposing bacteria!

Now your next question is, why does the odor go away after I start running the coolant in the machine? And the answer to that question is in the next episode of the Profit Edje, so look for it soon!

Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice. I’m Doug Heidenreich, now go find your Profit Edje!

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

In the last episode, I answered the reason why coolant goes bad, or stinks! Today I will answer the question why does the bad smell dissipate when the coolant is run in the machine for a few minutes?

The sulfur smell, or rotten egg smell, is the dead anaerobic bacteria. Like anything that dies it decays, and in most cases, smells bad if it is not covered up or is uncovered. When the coolant pump is turned on and circulated in the machine center, the anaerobic bacteria becomes uncovered, thus the rotten egg or dead body smell as some put it. The smell dissipates as the air is introduced into the coolant and kills most of the anaerobic bacteria.

Now, how do I get rid of bacteria in my coolant, you may ask? And the answer to that question is in the next episode of the Profit Edje, so look for it soon! Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice.

I’m Doug Heidenreich, now go find your Profit Edje!

 

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

In the last episode, I discussed why the bad smell dissipates when the coolant is run in the machine for a few minutes. Today I will talk about how to get rid of bacteria in the coolant.

 There are several ways to prevent, or stop, bacterial growth in your water based cutting fluid.

The first thing you have to decide is whether you want to filter the coolant or not.

If you do not want to filter the coolant then you basically have two options: Add biocide to the coolant. Remove the coolant from the sump and recharge it with fresh. Switch to a more robust water based cutting fluid.

If you do want to filter the coolant then you have to decide what the main issue is - solids, free oils, or a combination of both?

I will go into more detail with these approaches in the next episode of the Profit Edje, so look for it soon!

Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice.

I’m Doug Heidenreich, Now go find your Profit Edje!

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

In the last episode, I presented the non-filtering and filtering approaches to prevent the growth of bacteria in coolant. Today I will briefly discuss the non-filtering approach.

If a facility doesn’t want to filter their cutting fluid, what can they do to get rid of bacteria in their machine sumps? There are a few ways get rid of bacteria in the coolant. A facility may choose to add biocide to the sump that wipes out all bacteria – anaerobic and aerobic bacteria colonies. Now, this kills everything for a while, but bacteria can eventually grow back. So you will have to add periodic maintenance dosages at the coolant supplier’s recommendation. However, this does not take care of the contaminants that allow bacteria to flourish.

Another option is to dispose of the bad coolant. Cleaning the sump takes a lot of effort, but usually has to be done some time to remove the dirt from the sump. Draining the sump and recharging with fresh coolant will address the smell issue for a little while. Eventually, though, the left-over bacteria will take over the sump again.

Finally, switching to a more robust water based cutting fluid could be a good option. If your coolant is going rancid in a month, three months, or even 6 months, look into a different fluid. The technology is so advanced today that fluids are lasting a year or longer in the sump. Actually, they get too dirty to use before they go rancid. Also keep in mind that buying a lot of inexpensive coolant isn’t necessarily saving you money.

I will briefly discuss the filtering approach to getting rid of bacteria in the coolant in the next episode of the Profit Edje, so look for it soon!

Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice. I’m Doug Heidenreich, now go find your Profit Edje!

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

In the last episode, I briefly discussed the non-filtering approach getting rid of bacteria in coolant, Today I will briefly discuss the filtering approach.

 A facility needs to decide if solids, free oils, or a combination of both are the reason for their coolant rancidity. I will provide a few options, but by no MEANS is this an exhaustive list.

Let’s say that it is solids, then they would want to look at a bag or cartridge filter, centrifuge, indexing paper filter, or a hydrocyclone just to name a few.

If it is just free oils, then using a belt skimmer or a wheel skimmer might do the trick. But keep in mind that these units only remove the floating oil the belt or wheel comes in contact with and they drag out coolant too. If you’ve ever examined the oil holding container these units drain into, you’ve notice that most of it is coolant.

Most machine sumps have issues with both solids and free oils, though, and using a coalescing oil/water separator like our T.O.S.S. will help in those areas. It removes free floating, mechanically dispersed oils (beaten in oils not chemically emulsified) and suspended solids from the contaminated fluid and returns the clean coolant back to the sump. An efficient oil/water separator will drain off only the oil it removes preventing coolant drag out.

This concludes this issue of the Profit Edje. In the next series I'm going to discuss how to properly clean out machine sumps. So look for it soon.

Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice. I’m Doug Heidenreich, now go find your Profit Edje!

 

 

How to Properly Clean a Machine Sump

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

 In the last series, I discussed “Why coolant goes bad!”, if you would like to view that 5 part series, visit our website at www.edjetech.com.

 Today I will start another video series on how to properly clean a machine sump. These are basic principles that should be followed whether you are cleaning the machine sump for maintenance purposes or testing new fluid, to ensure a clean environment for that cutting fluid.

 Maintenance personnel and machine operators are not jumping up and down to clean machine sumps, so they get neglected until the machine needs to be serviced or the coolant smells so bad they can’t stand it anymore. This is a disservice to the machine center and hinders the performance of the cutting fluid and tooling.

Besides, when something goes wrong, what is the first thing operators usually blame? You got it, the cutting fluid.

The basic steps to cleaning a machine sump are to clean, remove, flush and then fill. In the next episode of the Profit Edje, I will discuss the first step “clean” so look for it soon!

Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice. I’m Doug Heidenreich, go find your Profit Edje!

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

In the last episode, I briefly mentioned the four steps to properly clean a machine sump.

Step 1: Clean,

Step 2: Remove,

Step 3: Flush and

Step 4: Fill.

Today I will discuss Step 1: Clean.

About 3 days to a week before the initial clean out of the sump, take measures to cleanse the sump of bacteria and fungus.  This usually means adding a sump side biocide or fungicide.  Your fluid supplier should be able to help you determine which of these additives are needed. The "cleanser" will dissolve into the metalworking fluid and kill the bacteria/fungus in the sump as well as in the delivery lines of the machine center.  If there was a bad odor to the sump, it may even smell better after a few days. Do not get lax at this time just because the smell has gone away. Continue on with the next three steps.

In the next episode of the Profit Edje, I will discuss the second step “Remove” so look for it soon! Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice.

I’m Doug Heidenreich. Now, go find your Profit Edje!

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

In the last episode, I discussed Step one on how to start cleaning your machine sump. Today I will discuss Step 2: Remove. But first, lets’ review Step 1: Clean.

Prior to the initial clean out of the sump, you needed to cleanse the sump of bacteria and fungus.  Your fluid supplier should have provided the proper sump side biocide or fungicide for your coolant.  This kills the bacteria/fungus in the sump as well as in the delivery lines of the machine center. 

Okay, now that step one is done -- Step 2: Remove -- needs to be accomplished.

Remove all the contaminated fluid and chips in the machine sump. Make sure to remove any screens and clean, scrape and wipe down the inside of the sump and inside the machining area itself.  Don’t forget the conveyor, any auxiliary filters, and high pressure systems like a ChipBlaster. Fill with a machine cleaner, (usually your fluid vendor can supply you with this).  Let the cleaner circulate in the machine, again follow the directions given to you by your fluid supplier. But usually circulating the cleaner for about 30 minutes is adequate.

In the next episode of the Profit Edje, I will discuss the third step “Flush” so look for it soon!

Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice.

I’m Doug Heidenreich. Now, go find your Profit Edje!

Hi, I’m Doug Heidenreich and you are watching the Profit Edje!

In the last episode, I discussed Step 2 on how to remove the coolant from the machine sump. Today I will discuss Step 3: Flush. But first, lets’ review the previous two steps.

Step 1 had you add biocide and/or fungicide to kill all the nasty stuff. Step 2 we had to remove all the contaminated fluid and chips in the machine sump, fill it with a machine cleaner and let that circulate in the machine.

Now that you have circulated the cleaner, pump it out and flush the system with water to make sure the cleaner is completely removed.  Remember to wash down the inside of the machine cabinet. For extra protection, flush the system again with a clean solution of fluid, around 1-2%, with the coolant the sump will be recharged with. Once that is done, pump the sump dry, and you are ready for the final step.

In the next episode of the Profit Edje, I will discuss the fourth step “Fill” so look for it soon!

Please visit our website at edjetech.com and follow us on twitter @edjetechservice.

I’m Doug Heidenreich. Now, go find your Profit Edje!